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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
much. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> >> woodruff: next, how the american education system stacks up in global rankings and the questions surrounding that assessment. jeffrey brown has the story. >> brown: it's considered by many the world's most important exam. the program for international student assessment, or "pisa" test, has been given to 15-year- olds in 65 countries every three years since 2000. a way to test and compare performances in reading, math and science. results from 2012 were released today, and, once again, the u.s. hovered near the middle of the pack, lagging in some areas even as other countries advanced. math remains the biggest challenge. 29 other systems had higher average scores than american high schoolers. the u.s. fared better in reading, where it ranked 20th, and in science, ranking 23rd. the best results were in east asia, where students from shanghai, singapore, south korea and japan, among others, placed near the top. pisa results also showed another concern for american teens as well: a smaller percentage of them reached the top levels of proficiency.
. the education system is riddled with problems. and you also see that there is an increasing public corruption. so the current president has been involved in a huge scandal involving his private home. so people look to nelson mandela and think theres with a leader. there was someone with real integrity. so i think that this is a moment for people to look back and reflect on where they've come from and how to get back on the right path. >> woodruff: and also by definition losing what i think you call the moral center for the country. >> well, i think for many people nelson pan della does represent a kind of moral center. and a choice to turn away from violence, to turn away from strife. and to turn away from racial divisions. and instead of standing in judgement of one another, to reconcile and to admit that we did terrible things to each other. but now we're ready to move on. and i think that was the great gift of nelson mandela. that he was able to bring people together in a way that made them feel that they could forgive and made them move on. >> woodruff: lydia, one other thing. you wrote t
, a conversation about charting a different course in the world of higher education. today, spelman's beverly daniel tatum became one of four college presidents and the first from a historically black institution to receive the carnegie corporation's annual leadership award. the foundation cited her work in encouraging women to pursue careers in the so-called stem fields of science, technology, engineering and math and for her decision to drop intercollegiate sports in favor of student health. beverly tatum joins us now from atlanta. welcome, professor at that time up, president tatum. >> thank you so much. in full disclosure carnegie is one of our funders here at the newshour but i want to ask you who has motivated ou to refocus the academic goals at spelman and whether that is applicable elsewhere. >> well, let me begin by saying that at spelman we have been focused on stem education as well as a broader liberal arts focus for many years. and that doesn't begin with me but i'm happy to say that since i've been president at spelman we've been able to keep moving forward at a time when we se
with a second look at an education story with big implications for both students and teachers. it's about a new set of standards known as the common core. our special correspondent for education, john merrow, reports. >> you glis can start. >> freedom of speech should mean what it mean, freedom of speep, shouldn't be limitations on freedom. >> i disagree. >> reporter: students in the center of the room argue their case. >> but you have no proof. >> 30 seconds. >> 18 members on the side-lines offer support. >> they're passing notes saying you should ask this followup question. or look at this page in your text so that you can reference this piece of evidence to support your idea. >> we have power but we also have power. >> reporter: to prepare theo for the debate the 8th graders have read several articles about freedom of speech. >> you can't just say what you are saying because you feel like that's rightment you need to like have evidence about it. >> you said that the government, that we have more power than the government. >> reporter: teacher erin gary keeps score. >> kids collect points for
your public television station to ask for your support. and that sueactions from state education officials. >> woodruff: finally tonight: this year's national book award for fiction went to a novel that re-tells a very familiar story from american history with a thoroughly new twist. jeff is back with that. >> brown: "i was born a colored man and don't you forget it. but i lived as a colored woman for 17 years." the words of kansas-born slave henry or henrietta schackleford who in the novel "the good lord bird" becomes one of the rag-tag followers of the abolitionist john brown and survives to tell of the raid on harper's ferry. this is the third novel by james mcbride. he's also author of the bestselling memoir, "the color of water: a black man's tribute to his white mother." first, congratulations to you. >> thank you very much. >> so the story has been written and written about in nonfiction and fiction. you, what, felt you had something more to tell? >> well, i wanted to tell it in a funny way and i wanted people to, you know, know about them. and i wanted-- i tried to come u
children and six educators were shot to death by 20-year- old adam lanza. a judge ordered the audio material released under the state's freedom of information law. the suspected gunman in the deadly shooting at los angeles international airport has made his first court appearance. paul ciancia entered no plea today to charges he killed an airport security officer and wounded three other people last month. he was denied bail. the 23-year-old suspect was wounded by police during the attack. in economic news, a survey of leading corporate chief executives found they're more optimistic and plan to increase hiring. at the same time, growth at service sector companies last month was the weakest since june. the conflicting data left wall street looking for direction. the dow jones industrial average lost almost 25 points to close at 15,889. the nasdaq rose a fraction of a point to close at 4,038. there's word today that the great majority of american silent films are now gone forever. the library of congress reported 70% of the 11,000 feature-length movies have been lost or destroyed. only
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)